Response to New Covid Measures

As we get closer to opening up, we have provided details on the new measures, read for more details

If you are told to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace or the NHS COVID-19 app:

  • Self-isolate immediately
  • Do not leave your home for any reason – if you need food or medicine, order it online or by phone, or ask friends and family to drop it off at your home.
  • Do not have visitors in your home, including friends and family – except for essential care. - try to avoid contact with anyone you live with as much as possible.
  • Any people you live with and any people in your support bubble do not need to self isolate if you do not have symptoms.
  • Your self-isolation period includes the day you were last in contact with the person who tested positive and the next 10 full days.
  • If you live with someone at higher risk from COVID-19, try to arrange for them to stay with friends or family while you are self-isolating.

If you have had a ‘close contact’ alert

If you are self-isolating because the app has alerted you that you have been near someone who has tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19), it will use the date of the last ‘close contact’ you had with the person to calculate how long you need to self-isolate.

You need to self-isolate for 10 full days from the date you were last in contact with the person: the ‘encounter date’. This means that if you were in close contact with someone who tested positive for coronavirus on the 1st of the month, you would need to self-isolate up to and including the 11th of that month.

If you have symptoms

If you are self-isolating because you have coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms, and have entered these into the app, the app will use the day you reported you first had symptoms to calculate how long you need to self-isolate. When you enter symptoms in the app it will ask you for the date they first started; the ‘symptoms onset date’.

You need to self-isolate for 10 full days from the date you first had symptoms of coronavirus. This means that if you first had symptoms on the 1st of the month, you would need to self isolate up to and including the 11th of that month.

If you said that you cannot remember when your symptoms started, the app will calculate your ‘symptoms onset date’ as 2 days before you reported symptoms into the app.

If you have had a positive test result

If you report symptoms and book a coronavirus test through the app, the app will automatically be updated with your test result. Your isolation period is calculated using the date you first had symptoms, so if you test positive, this date will not change.

If you tested positive but did not enter symptoms or book your test through the app, you may be able to link your test result to the app using a code. In this case, the app uses the date the code was generated to set your self-isolation countdown timer. This is because it does not have any other information about your test or when your symptoms started. The date the code was generated is counted as ‘Day 0’ in your 10-day countdown. This means that if your test code were generated on the 1st of the month, you would need to self-isolate up to and including the 11th of that month.

If you test positive, you will also be contacted by the wider NHS Test and Trace or NHS Wales Test, Trace, Protect service. Contact tracers will use the date the test was taken or the date you confirm your symptoms started to calculate your isolation period. If the date your test was taken is not the same as the date your code was generated, then this isolation period may differ from the isolation period on the app. Read more about what do if the self-isolation countdown on your app is different from the advice you have been given by NHS Test and Trace or NHS Wales Test, Trace, Protect.

If you have had a negative test result.

If you test negative, the countdown timer may clear or reset. However, in some cases, you may need to continue to self-isolate even if you have received a negative test result. If this is the case, your self-isolation countdown timer will reflect this.

Guidelines for pay during self-isolation.

It is an offence for an employer to knowingly allow a person who is required to self-isolate to work anywhere other than where they are self-isolating (normally their home). This applies only when they are required to self-isolate following a positive test, contacted by NHS Test and Trace or their local authority, or where they are required to quarantine after returning from abroad.

Paid and unpaid leave

Employees:

If you are unable to do your job from home, you may ask your employer for annual leave to accommodate your period of self-isolation.

If your employer refuses an annual leave request, you may be able to agree a period of unpaid leave instead.

If you are on sick leave or self-isolating because of coronavirus, you may want to speak to your employer about whether you are eligible for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (furlough). You may be eligible for Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) while you are on sick leave or self-isolating. If you are put on furlough while on sick leave or self-isolating, you will no longer get sick pay but should be treated as any other furloughed employee.

You may also want to speak to your employer about whether you are eligible for furlough if:

  • You are at the highest risk of severe illness from coronavirus – also known as clinically extremely vulnerable - and are unable to work from home.
  • You are unable to work, including from home, due to caring responsibilities arising from coronavirus, such as caring for children who are at home as a result of school and childcare facilities closing, or caring for a vulnerable individual in your household.

Employers:

If it is not possible to arrange alternative work that can be completed from home, you should try to accommodate periods of self-isolation by granting annual leave, or unpaid leave if that is not possible.

For anyone on the payroll before 30 October 2020, you may have the option to put them on furlough.

Employers can furlough employees who are clinically extremely vulnerable, at the highest risk of severe illness from coronavirus or off on long-term sick leave. It is up to employers to decide whether to furlough these employees.

Statutory Sick Pay (SSP)

You can get £96.35 per week Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) if you are too ill to work. It is paid by your employer for up to 28 weeks.

You cannot get less than the statutory amount. You can get more if your company has a sick pay scheme (or ‘occupational scheme’) - check your employment contract.

If you cannot work because of coronavirus (COVID-19) You could get SSP if you are self isolating because:

  • You or someone you live with has COVID-19 symptoms or has tested positive for COVID 19.
  • You have been notified by the NHS or public health authorities that you have been in contact with someone with COVID-19.
  • Someone in your support bubble (or your ‘extended household’ if you live in Scotland or Wales) has COVID-19 symptoms or has tested positive for COVID-19.
  • You have been advised by a doctor or healthcare professional to self-isolate before going into hospital for surgery.
  • You could get SSP for every day you are off work.
  • You cannot get SSP if you are self-isolating after entering or returning to the UK and do not need to self-isolate for any other reason.

If your employee is off work because of coronavirus (COVID-19)

You must pay an employee SSP if they are self-isolating and off work for at least 4 days and any of the following apply:

  • they or someone they live with has COVID-19 symptoms or has tested positive for COVID-19.
  • they have been notified by the NHS or public health authorities that they have been in contact with someone with COVID-19.
  • someone in their support bubble (or your ‘extended household’ if you live in Scotland or Wales) has COVID-19 symptoms or has tested positive for COVID-19
  • They have been advised by a doctor or healthcare professional to self-isolate before going into hospital for surgery. You must pay your employee from the first ‘qualifying day’ they are off work. The date will depend on why they are off work.

You must pay them on or after one of the following dates:

  • 13 March 2020 - if they or someone they live with has symptoms or has tested positive for COVID-19.
  • 28 May 2020 - if your employee has been notified by the NHS or public health authorities that they have come into contact with someone with COVID-19.
  • 6 July 2020 - if someone in their support bubble (or extended household in Scotland or Wales) has symptoms or has tested positive for COVID-19.
  • 26 August 2020 - if your employee has been advised by a doctor or healthcare professional to self-isolate before going into hospital for surgery.

A ‘qualifying day’ is a day an employee usually works on.

Reclaiming SSP

You can reclaim up to 2 weeks’ SSP if all of the following apply:

  • your employee was off work because they had COVID-19 or were self-isolating. • your employee was off work because they were shielding - before 26 April 2021 in Scotland, before 12 April 2021 in Northern Ireland and before 1 April 2021 in England and Wales
  • your PAYE payroll scheme started on or before 28 February 2020.
  • you had fewer than 250 employees on 28 February 2020.

You can reclaim up to £96.35 a week for each employee.

You cannot reclaim SSP if your employee is off sick for any other reason.

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Cirencester Business Park
Tetbury Road
Cirencester 
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